Quruli Interview Translation, Parts 3&4 of 4

Original: Cinra.net
Translated by Erin Grace

Maybe we’re musicians because we’re bad at social media.  Maybe if we were good at it, we’d have different careers.

--So why don’t you use Twitter?

K: You mean, since I’m an indies musician, maybe I’d want my name to spread like wildfire?  Or maybe I’d want an easy way to make friends with people overseas?  But I already know how it’ll be if I do something like that (laugh), and into the fires of that hell…

--…You’re not going to jump. (laugh)  Do you also not use Twitter, Sato?

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Quruli Interview Translation, Parts 1&2 of 4

Original: Cinra.net
Translated by Erin Grace

Quruli paints a picture of “the things that tend to be overlooked.”

Quruli: the band whose B-side compilation “Boku no Sundeita Machi” (released in May) achieved their first #1 ranking on Oricon.  Quruli’s new album, “Kotoba ni Naranai, Egao wo Misete Kure Yo,” is designed to make you re-consider the current state of pop music.  With its simple 3-piece composition recorded in their hometown of Kyoto, this album is, according to Kishida Shigeru, “a low-specced train.” It’s not just that it has a special topic, or that the theme crosses and fuses genres (that’s to be expected from Quruli).  Instead, when you see their music suddenly hit the charts, you come to recognize that, in a world of mediocre modern music, albums in which the artists having fun and playing freely are necessary.  This is an album that’s quintessentially Quruli, full of a rebellious spirit at odds with their loose style.

(Interviewer: Akiatsu Kaneko; Photos: Kashiwai Mansaku)

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